Public projects 3

A User-Friendly Interface in a Simple Timer

Project tutorial by frenchy22

  • 2,331 views
  • 1 comment
  • 7 respects

Ultra Low Power IR Remote Control

by frenchy22

  • 1,035 views
  • 0 comments
  • 4 respects

A Serious Stroboscope

Project tutorial by frenchy22

  • 2,730 views
  • 0 comments
  • 9 respects

Toolbox 1


Respected projects 3

Hack your Bathroom Scale to a UNO ArduScale

Project showcase by plouc68000

  • 964 views
  • 0 comments
  • 2 respects

Battery Powered TV Remote Control with 3D-Printed Case

Project tutorial by stegabetti

  • 4,803 views
  • 7 comments
  • 5 respects

Floating and Spinning Earth Globe

Project tutorial by Herwig Taveirne

  • 3,372 views
  • 0 comments
  • 10 respects

Comments 2

  • Battery Powered TV Remote Control with 3D-Printed Case 9 months ago

    Hey, you have fun games during the lockdown. I did something similar, but with several differences. Instead of replacing a broken IR remote control, I wanted to have a single one to control my TV set and my decoder, and I equipped it with 16 buttons. As I have no 3D printer, I made a no-enclosure design, it's quite original.
    But above all, I used another method to save the battery, more hardware and more brutal : with a pair of FETs (an N-channel and a P-channel), I interrupt the power supply circuit of the Arduino board when no button is pressed. For this, each button is connected to the gate of the N-channel FET by a diode and to the ground by a resistor. The drain of the N-channel FET controls the gate of the P-channel FET through which the board is powered. As soon as a button is pressed, a voltage is applied to the gate of the N-channel FET and the P-channel FET powers the board which sends the IR code to the television set or to the decoder.
    I'm afraid this solution will stress the Arduino board a bit, I'm waiting to see if it will survive longer than the battery.

  • Accurate Clock Just Using an Arduino 11 months ago

    Hello,
    Very nice project, but I think that, instead of replacing the millis() function by an interrupt and of rewriting the delay() function, it is possible to take into account the rolling out of the millis() function every 50 days by the following code :

    [code]
    unsigned long actualTime, lastTime, elapsedTime;
    ...
    actualTime=millis();
    if (actualTime < lastTime) // The millis counter has rolled out
    elapsedTime=0xFFFFFFFFul-lastTime+actualTime;
    else
    elapsedTime=actualTime-lastTime;
    [/code]

    And you reset the delay when you want by copying actualTime into lastTime.

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